# The Eightfold Path, World Religions, Buddha, with Works Cited - Signifiance

The Eightfold Path, World Religions, Buddha, with Works Cited

I got a 50 out of 50 on this paper. Please do not copy this word for word, use the format and information to help you with your own paper. Good Luck. The Eightfold Path by JOE Professor Hartman World Religions PHI243 10 December 2009 Scarbrough 1 JOE Professor Hartman World Religions PHI243 10 December 2009 The Eightfold Path The “Eightfold Path” of the Buddhist religion is believed to be the way to end all suffering. More than steps the “Eightfold Path”are elements. They are not to be followed in to it.

Not only does following the Path lead one to “Nirvana”, but during life it releases one from The Noble “Eightfold Path”is divided into three groups. The first group, “The Moral Discipline Group”, is made up of three steps, “Right Speech”, “Right Conduct”, and “Right Concentration Group” it contains, “Right Effort”, “Right Mindfulness”, and “Right Concentration”. The final group, “The Wisdom Group”, is composed of the final two disciplines, “Right Effort” and “Right Aspirations”. The path that Buddhists follow is embodied within these three groups. With moral discipline as the foundation for concentration, concentration the foundation for teachings of Buddha seem to cover all aspects of an enjoyable, ethical, and honorable way of 2500 years old. The First group, “The Moral Discipline”, contains “Right Speech”, “Right Conduct”, and “Nonindulgence in loose or hurtful talk or in ill will; one must love all creatures with the right sort Page 2 is just as susceptible as anyone to gossip and hurtful talk. Fortunately, Buddhists participate in meditation and concentration which, in principle, ould allow more peace, thereby maintaining a more positive peaceful attitude towards others. This would also apply to the second discipline, means “Choosing the proper occupation of one’s time and energies, obtaining one’s livelihood in ways consistent with Buddhist principles. ”(Noss 183) When a person is becoming of age, and deciding upon an occupation or career, important decisions need to be made. When a The second group called the “Concentration Group” contains “Right Effort”, “Right Mindfulness” and “Right Concentration”.

The “Concentration Group” is more training then it is Mindfulness” and “Right Concentration”in order to endure. Energy is the key to deliverance, if it is focusedcorrectly. Energyon the other hand can also be a Buddhists downfall. Energy can the mind he can overcome anything. A current day Buddhist can use effort, along with (Bodhi 11) Page 3 “Untiring and unremitting intellectual alertness in discrimination between wise and unwise say, and think. When a Buddhist focuses on the correct things, says the correct things, and the past. Perhaps that is because we live in this time.

Understanding and applying this love of others, to harm no living being, and to suppress all misery-producing desires current or Buddhist from the past has the ability to love others, harm no one in any way, and suppress any feeling or emotion that would drag his focus away from the teachings of Buddha then he will have the strength to overcome any large obstaclethat would lie in his or her path. “Eightfold Path”. A Buddhist who has the ability to conquer these eight steps can find an unchallenged true happiness. appears to really allow anyone to break our mind down into smaller simple tasks.

When we go about our day, doing the things that we do, it is easy to forget how to improve our lives. If you were to walk up to someone on the street and ask them what they would do to improve their life, most people would answer with a new job, or a better car, material things and I am as guilty as anyone. Before studying the teachings of Buddha, the only thing that I knew was that he was a Page 4 short, fat, bald guyand even that is not accurate. I find peace in Buddha’steachings. it down into logic. When a person tries to deal with these emotional topics it is very easy to lose focus.

The Path allows us to look at emotions and deal with them systematically. Following this employment would change,I am currently in sales. There is no peace in my career up to this learned from the “Eightfold Path” is that, the best is up to me, inside, not what others perceive me as. I am the only one who can find inner peace for me. This sounds like a simple concept but as a busy American caught up in life I never think of simple things like that. communications within the relationships seem so superficial now that I have taken a look at myself from the outside.

Through Buddha’s teachings I have realized how much I do not work on myself. Now I understand that I just allow life to happen around me. I need to take control of my life and break it apart in orderto fix things. What is so shocking regarding all of the new information that I have learned is that,I never realized how out of control things are. A week ago before I understood any of the information that I do now, I would have thought things were nearly perfect. I knew that there were areas in my life that could use improvement but now I see that I literatelydo not run my own mind.

It is influenced by everything around me. My environment around me has determinedmy reactions, emotions, and decisions. Buddha’s Page 5 found different areasthat I apply to my life. The “Eightfold Path” of the Buddhist religion is something that will permanentlybe part of me. Buddhist. Just like most people in the middle class I aspire for more toys. The Buddhist teachings have altered my thinking a bit. I now need to consider more financial independence. Buddha, although over 2500 years ago, was light-yearsahead of his time. His knowledge and the individual then the group.

He did not tell his followers yes or no, he simply displayed how to focus on control of your mind and emotions. If people, including myself, would focus more on inner peace than what is going on around them, the world would take care of itself. After all if more people applied the “Eightfold Path” to their lives there would be no hate, war, or even anger. Page 6 Work Cited The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to the End of Suffering”, Bhikkhu Bodhi. Access to Insight, Noss, David S. A History of World’s Religions. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2003, 2008.