A Plea For Protecting Desert Gems English Literature Essay

The Grand Canyon is so achingly huge and vacant there ‘s plentifulness of room for it to be filled to the rim with all walks of life look up toing her beauty. Although the howling traffic will most likely make full the air like the background drone of a large metropolis, the bulk of people are all for handiness. Visualizing “ power linesaˆ¦a 100-foot pink H2O tower and tract-styles houses ” ( 57 ) inhabited by park Texas Rangers at Lee ‘s Ferry on the calm shores of the Colorado River, Edward Abbey ‘s Desert Solitaire walks us through these horrific programs for some of our state ‘s most sacred lands. Even though these scenes are iniquitous, they are planned for about all of our national Parkss. The inability to see a destructive connexion between the planned development of stat mis of paved main road to haul monolithic sums of people into crude and delicate countries creates a contradiction. It would look logical that if people want to see the beauty, they would make all that is required to protect it. Abbey utilizes both emotional ( poignancy ) and logical ( logos ) entreaty for most of Desert Solitaire to make his end.

Sinking the reader ‘s bosom is Abbey ‘s purpose. He uses the pathos literary technique to capture the reader ‘s attending without being overzealous because so he would lose their involvement. Abbey plans and chooses his words carefully so as to paint a image in the reader ‘s head. This is a literary device aimed at an audience who is already slightly acquainted with a subject. Is there truly a maestro program for a “ conventional high-velocity main road ” ( 57 ) with “ banked curves and deep cuts ” ( 57 ) lined with “ bisecting power lines ” ( 57 ) planned for the “ crude, quiet, virgin wilderness ” ( 56 ) ? There might be, but what Abbey is truly seeking to convey is a immense contradiction between nature and people. There have been and most likely ever will be, sing the sum of people that tour through them each twelvemonth, major betterments made to our national Parkss. A visit from the study crew suggests that it will probably be really shortly. However, doing such an premise without outright losing all dependability is an achievement that this essay and its writer achieve inordinately good. Every word that Abbey uses efforts to rock the reader via their emotions. He writes the essay utilizing emotions and the entreaty of natural beauty combined with an organized list of facts to convey cogency and by making so he has gut-wrenched his intended audience.

The essay convinces the reader from the beginning that Abbey is logical as he disregards the “ dreamers ” ( 53 ) warning. However, he does make an immediate urgency in the reader ‘s head to cognize about the “ sinister program ” ( 52 ) , as he confirms through facts that the developments already “ began to go on a few yearss ago ” ( 52 ) . The reader believes that the writer is non leaping to decisions, because he confirms it with a “ few illustrations ” ( 56 ) which he is “ personally familiar ” ( 56 ) . His sentences and paragraphs are short, for the most portion, to acquire his message across telegraphically, and clearly, so that no significance is lost. The reader ‘s urgency to cognize is exactly the type of first reaction that Abbey wants. He states his concern by give voicing it to sound dramatic, but so supports it by focus oning on existent happenings. This tactic keeps Abbey ‘s purpose discreet until he ‘s ready to expose it. By maintaining off from a straight-forward statement Abbey stays off from the possibility of the reader disagreeing and hence establishes credibleness.

On the surface Abbey ‘s essay is a persuasive piece intended to convert the reader to take action in order to acquire the Wilderness Protection Act implemented before the sinister maestro program takes over all national Parkss. However, upon closer reading, the critical reader might see that Abbey ‘s statement is perchance non entirely a rational statement, which is uneven in that Abbey repeatedly points out that much is at interest. The shallowness of the Arches National Park park Texas Ranger ‘s statement leads one to seek out other more likely intents.

The main rhetorical purpose here seems to be to carry the reader to move rationally against the pitiless Federal Government in order to protect the Parkss from people. Abbey works towards his intents through his calculated usage of enunciation, sentence length, and persuasive entreaties. Abbey ‘s primary concern here is one of persuasion and he puts forth rather an statement, while trying to stay rational. But, is Abbey truly leting for two sides, or is he merely moving selfish? Either the Wilderness Protection Act is instantly enacted or the Parkss will be destroyed. If Abbey is truly making everything he can by beging aid, in add-on to the national park system being meant to the protect the land, so why is at that place no chance for negociating the execution of the act before more building takes topographic point? Abbey is merely stating the reader what they must make. The reader feels like they are being backed into a corner. Either the reader gives in and helps or if non so the devastation of the national Parkss will be the reader ‘s mistake.

Abbey ‘s usage of linguistic communication and manner is peculiarly of import to his intent. He does non utilize inordinate rhetoric. In fact, his point is made instead rapidly. It is noteworthy that although Abbey choruss from utilizing nonliteral linguistic communication that plays on word significances, he does extensively utilize contradictions and extremes as in nature vs. manmade when comparing aluminium, fibreglass, molded plastic, and electric toothbrushes where there one time was nil more than a three twenty-four hours old newspaper. Abbey ‘s initial effort at seeking to convert the reader that he is logical and rational, and the 1s that ab initio warned him are the dreamers and the alarmists, is successful. Abbey establishes a connexion with the reader by informing them that he excessively sat in their place paying no attending to extremists. But, midway through the essay Abbey ‘s reaction shows the reader he is back to rationally responding based on facts and concrete grounds mentioning to the old state of affairs as the “ small episode of the grey landrover ” ( 54 ) , as if that was minor compared to what is go oning now.

Abbey ‘s deliberate usage of inclusive and sole words helps to put up the National Park system ‘s Master Plan in resistance to the desert treasure. His usage of a list nailing existent facts, in add-on to highly descriptive linguistic communication gets his point across. The “ wide highwaysaˆ¦banked curves ” ( 57 ) , and “ steel and asphalt ” campsites razed by bulldozers all occupying the virgin wilderness ” ( 57 ) do quite an emotional impact on the reader. He convinces the reader that it ‘s their land and the large ugly authorities is destroying it unless they are stopped, and the reader is the lone 1 that can halt them.

Built subtly into his linguistic communication are Abbey ‘s persuasive entreaties. He is clearly taking the moral high land when he asserts that he “ could easy site 10 more illustrations of unneeded or destructive development ” ( 58 ) . He clearly cites adequate to convert the logical individual and if they do n’t demand “ execution ” ( 58 ) it surely is n’t because of the apathetic park Texas Ranger. He assures the reader that this “ is go oning, to the bulk of our national Parkss ” ( 58 ) , connoting that the ground for his urgency is one of immediate protection. He is in support of the authorities ‘s Act, he merely wants it implemented. This is a carefully constructed sense of ethos. Abbey wants the reader to see that his motive is the saving of the land, but he needs aid. Abbey makes every attempt to portray himself as merely merely a composure, non-reactive, peaceable individual. Harmonizing to Abbey he ‘s merely seeking to protect countries that he “ loves excessively much ” ( 58 ) . And if the reader agrees, they will “ rise up up on their hind legs ” to fall in Abbey in the cause. Abbey ‘s effort to distance himself from the really people he works for and his seeking the aid of the reader are successful. Ultimately, it ‘s Abbey and the reader against the authorities. And if the reader does n’t respond, so the Parkss will be ruined.